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Display's and Capture Card's: The Beginners Guide

Rollergold

Rosa Boi
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Joined
Jun 3, 2018
Messages
19
Location
Calgary
#1
DISPLAY'S AND CAPTURE CARDS
The Beginners Guide

Part 1: Displays
This will serve as a beginners guide for folks looking to buying a new display and are totally lost at all of the choices at your disposal. An overview of specifications that all displays have, what to really look
for and what to ignore out for when buying or researching a display will be discussed. When looking for a new display the first question you must ask yourself "what will I use my display for?" Questions along the lines of "what is the best possible display are not helpful questions to ask, no display is perfect. Each one will have advantages and disadvantages, so asking yourself what you're priorities are, comparing different displays and deciding for yourself which display is for you is the best route, because otherwise most responses will be people that are basing their answer on the display they are currently using now
which may or may not be the right display for you. So do yourself a favor and buy the display for you based off you research not solely someone else's preference.

Note: I as most people don't review products for a living so I'm basing this guide off of my own experience and knowledge of how displays work.

Section I: Display Types
Before researching on which display to buy it is best to know the 3 core types of displays and their inherited advantages and disadvantages.

CRT - The oldest core display type around. Most of you likely still have one of these displays in your
home. CRT's are known by their curved glass or plastic display, and huge size and weight. Still liked by graphic's pro's and serious gamers though because of accurate colors, many native resolutions, crazy
fast response times and zero input lag, with the last two being two of the most important factors if your
new display is for gaming. Main drawbacks for CRT's being size/weight, reduced image sharpness
compared to LCD or Plasma displays overtime and difficulty in locating a brand new CRT in this age of "flat screen" LCD's and Plasma displays.

LCD - One of the most popular flat panel display types around, using in a nutshell a combo of liquid crystals, voltage to control them and either LED's or a fluorescent lamp as a backlight, LCD's offer the
largest range of sizes, the fastest response times short of CRT displays, and good vibrancy and as such have become the mainstream display of choice. LCD's tend to have fainter black levels, color vibrancy and narrower viewing angles on average then plasma displays however.

Section I-A: LCD Panel Types:
• TN- Short for Twisted Nematic, the most common and cheapest type of panel in LCD's
today, its name comes from the twisted like spiral of the TN cell when it's not powered
ON. TN panels offer the fastest response times and cheapest prices at the cost of
viewing angles and overall image quality. TN's are also the only panel that is fast enough to show stereoscopic 3D content at this time. If you require precise colours or a wide viewing angles steer clear of TN Panels however.
•IPS- Short for In-Plane Switching. The name comes from how the crystals act when
voltage is applied to them. IPS panels offer superior colour reproduction and wider
viewing angles compared to TN panels at the cost slight reduction in response time and IPS panels cost more to make compared to TN panels. If you require precise colours or a wide viewing angles IPS panels are the ones to go for. If you want to play console or PC games in stereoscopic 3D you will still need a TN panel for that however.
•PLS, VA, MVA - Basically cousins to the IPS panels. Most advantages and disadvantages
of IPS panels also apply to PLS, VA and MVA panels besides price as these panels were
made to have the cost of the TN panel with the quality of IPS and not pay LG licencing fees since LG owns the patent on IPS technology

Asus VH236H ([TN]Top) Vs. Asus PA238QR ([IPS]Bottom) in Color Differences




Plasma - The main contender for LCD's sales crown, plasma displays work by applying an electrical
current though cells of gas which heat up and glow, creating the picture. Offering deeper blacks, better
colour vibrancy and wider viewing angles on average than most LCD displays plasma is the display of choice if you're looking for a heavy moving watching display. Plasma displays tend to start off as large displays and stay large (37 inches and up) so compact display lovers need not apply. The big problem with plasma displays though is their burn-in effect, which happens when a stationary picture on the
display is left in place for an extended period of time and becomes etched or burned in to the display
even if the display is off, todays plasma displays are less vulnerable to burn in but care still must be taken for the displays first 100-150 hours of run time.


Section II: TV or Monitor?
Now that you have decided on a display type now do you want a TV tuner or just a straight up monitor
without the tuner? For gamers there is a difference between the two in the game critical areas of response time and input lag.

TV - Short for television, one of the biggest physical differences that a tv has over a straight up monitor
is the inclusion of a TV tuner so you get over the air broadcasts and sometimes cable tv channels
without the need for a separate cable box. TV's also tend have slower reacting panels in the case of LCD's and tend to add more and/or allow more processing of the image before it is displayed on the screen which may result in better image quality, as a result TV's tend to have more input lag then a
straight up monitor. Some TV's though offer a game mode which strips out a lot of the image processing
in favor of reduced input lag. TV's also tend to be larger on average then monitors of the same price
range and have more connections then most monitors

Monitor - Striped of its TV tuner, monitors are smaller leaner counterparts to TV's that tend to sit on a
computer desk rather than on your AV rack. While mostly relegated to the office, monitors have also
found a home with hard core gamers because their faster response times and reduced input lag
compared to TV's and most also come with an HDMI input and sometimes speakers so you watch tv on it if you have a cable box

Hybrid - If you must have a large display but concerned about input lag, fear not some stores offer what
is called a Large Format Display or Digital Sign. Commonly found at the airport or at malls displaying ad's
LFD's are basically HDTV's striped of their post image processing routines and are designed for precise
fast moving and long lasting applications like ad displays, medical and education applications and as
such have input lag on par with a good monitor. Be ready to pay up though for it as LFD's can cost two to
three times more than a HDTV of the same size and many don't come with a stand either, but if you need a large low lag display LFD's are king.

Section III: Display Specs
A Rundown of the most common specs printed on the box or on a store page for a display

Resolution - The maximum number of pixels a display can show within its display area. So a 1080 p/i
display will have a maximum horizontal resolution count of 1920 pixels by a maximum vertical count of
1080, Hence 1080p/i. Always run a LCD or Plasma display at its highest or native resolution when
possible. CRT users can run their display at almost any resolution as it has no single native resolution.

Refresh Rate - The maximum number of times per second a monitor can update the image that is being shown on screen. The higher the rate the smoother motion will be, and the more frames per second the display can show without image tearing showing up, for gaming the higher the refresh rate the better. Most displays have a refresh rate of 60hz but some can go up to 240hz. Keep in mind to take advantage of refresh rates higher then 60hz you will need to be playing on PC as consoles are locked to either 30 or 60 FPS.
Adaptive Refresh Rates - Basically its where the Video card tells the display how often to refresh based on the Frame Rate of the game being played. Adaptive refresh allows for smoother motion even during FPS dips and reduced input lag compared to running Vsync and removes the image tearing associated with uncapped FPS. Two options for Adaptive refresh exist G-Sync and Free Sync. Both are only for PC gaming and both require a compatible monitor. For G-Sync you will need a Nvidia GTX 600 series GPU or later and a G-Sync compatible display and for AMD Free Sync you will need a R9 290 GPU or later and a Free Sync compatible display. Sorry console gamers adaptive refresh is for pc gaming right now but with HDMI 2.1 having a built in adaptive refresh rate standard its a sign that the next gen consoles from at least Microsoft and Sony might have this as well.​
(EDIT As of Mid 2018 Microsoft Has Announced that both Freesync adaptive refresh and 120hz refresh rate support is live on the Xbox One S & X)​
Progressive vs Interlaced - Before today's age of high definition content most TV's no matter their size were 640x480 or 786x576 interlaced displays which draws line 1 then line 3 and etc down to the end of the display then does line 2, 4 and etc effectively rendering the frame in 2
fields. Progressive scan draws the picture from top to bottom in order from line 1, 2, 3, and on in
1 field.
All monitors and most TV's today are progressive scan displays and if fed an interlaced
signal it needs to be de-interlaced in order for it to be displayed which in turn increases input lag

Common display resolutions:

SDTV 480i (NTSC, 720x480 split into two 240-line fields)

SDTV: 576i (PAL, 720x576 split into two 288-line fields)

EDTV: 480p (NTSC, 720x480)

EDTV: 576p (PAL, 720x576)

HDTV: 720p (1280x720)

HDTV: 1080i (1280x1080, 1440x1080, or 1920x1080 split into two 540-line fields)

HDTV: 1080p (1920x1080 progressive scan)

NTSC and PAL - The National Television Systems Committee is the analog display system used
for all of North America, parts of South America and parts of Asia including South Korea and Japan. Phase Alternating Line is the analog display system used by most of Europe, parts of
Africa and Asia and, all of Oceania. NTSC and PAL differ in the signal's frame rate/hertz
(30(29.95) fps or 60 Hz for NTSC and 25 fps or 50 Hz for PAL) and also differ in the resolution (640x480 for NTSC & 720x576 for PAL). Beyond standard definition content the resolution count
is same worldwide with only frame rate being the difference (25-50 fps for PAL, 30-60 fps for
NTSC)

Aspect Ratio - The relationship between a display's width and height. Most displays today are wider
than they are tall by a ratio of 16:9 although some monitors and many laptop displays are at a ratio of 16:10 although is it being replaced by 16:9 because massive amount of HD content available today.
Another standard, 4:3 is around but has little relevance today as all 7th gen console (360, PS3 and Wii) natively support 16:9 widescreen content regardless of the content being HD or SD.

Brightness - (luminosity) is often measured in candelas or cd/m2. Most displays today can provide up to 500 cd/m2, which is more than sufficient for normal use. If you plan on using the display in a room that receives large amounts of ambient sunlight you may want a display with a higher candela ratting though.

Contrast Ratio - is the degree of variation of the whitest and darkest parts of the image, is a very
important factor to note. If the LCD TV has a low contrast ratio, dark images will look muddy and gray, while light images will look washed out. A good contrast ratio to have in an LCD TV is 1,000:1 or higher.

Dynamic Contrast Ratio - On a lot of displays they advertise a contrast ratio of 10000:1 all up the way up to even 50 million to one. That is the displays dynamic contrast ratio which in a nut shell is the display analyzing the content and applying extra contrast in real time. This ratio is a useless number as very few displays can keep with all the little adjustments that would have be
made on the fly so the picture quality suffers and input lag is increased because of all little adjustments that are being made. Simply put don't use dynamic contrast settings on your
display, and know how to turn it off as well (googling "How to turn off dynamic contrast on the
[Insert display model here]" is a good place to start if you don't know how")

Response Time - The time it takes a pixel on a display to change color and then change back again. On
CRT's it is measured in ns (nanoseconds) and for LCD's and Plasma displays is measured in ms (milliseconds) CRT users need not worry about response time problems. For LCD and plasma users a good time to look for is 2-5 ms. If you display is slower then 2-5 ms (many HDTV's can be as slow as 8-16 ms) look for a "game mode" or "overdrive" mode in your display settings which will apply extra voltage to the pixels to speed up their reaction time at the cost overall image quality and of possible shorter life for the display.

Viewing Angles - The range of angles you can view a display before the discolouration of the image on
screen. For single person usage anything over 120 degrees is sufficient for normal use. If you plan on letting 2 or more people view the screen at the same time though a bigger range of angles is always better.

Inputs/Outputs - Never forget about what ports are available on the display you're looking for. TV's tend to have 2-5 HDMI ports, 1-2 component, composite ports and a VGA computer port.

Monitors tend to have 1 VGA port, 1 DVI, 1 HDMI port and sometimes a Display Port or even a component input.

Needs vary from person to person but for a peronal display for gaming; 1 HDMI, DVI or Display Port's is my personal bare minimum for a display. Some displays also have speakers and headphone jacks, handy if you don't have external speakers or in the case of the headphone jack handy for late night or private gaming.

Also make sure the Digital inputs (the HDMI, DVI and Display ports) are HDCP ready if you plan on hooking a cable box or PS3 up to it via a digital connection.



In Order: Component, Composite, HDMI, VGA & Display Port

Section: IV Non Listed Specs
Input Lag - The most important factor to consider if this display is going to be used mainly for gaming. Input lag is the delay between entering a command on a mouse or controller and seeing the result on screen. With games like Fighting games or First Person Shooters just a 2 frame (32 ms) input delay can mean the difference between you getting that sweet headshot or KO, to your character being a corpse on the ground.

Some games, fighting games in particular are even less forgiving with even 10 ms delay being unacceptable for some players. Problem with researching input lag is that it's not a spec printed
on the box or even on the displays website, you need to test the display you bought (more on that later) or ask around online (googling "[Insert display model here] input lag" is a good starting off point).


Section VI: FAQ's
Q: How to test for input lag

A: Unless you have access to a digital oscilloscope and know how to use one you will need a reference
display (CRT's being best), the test display, a digital camera with a fast adjustable shutter (1/1000's or less), (cameras within smart- or mobile-phones are inappropriate for this test) and you will also need a stopwatch program.

Then clone your desktop over both displays, run the stopwatch program and take a picture of the two displays. Note the difference between the reference display and the test display with the difference being the input lag of the display. Doing the test multiple times and averaging the results out is preferential.

Games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero 2 and up have built in input lag tests right within the game but the overall accuracy of these ingame tests are not up to par with the stopwatch test.



ASUS VH236H (Left, Zero Point) vs LG Flatron W1943TB (Right), avg difference: 13.3ms.

Q: Buying a new display is not an option right now, any tips on minimizing the input lag?

A: Enabling a display's game mode/overdrive mode is one option. Another option for most (but NOT all)
displays is hook up the device to display's VGA port as going that route bypasses more of the image processing compared going over HDMI or DVI. Running a source at a displays native resolution and avoiding interlaced video modes like 480i or 1080i can also help. Most TV's and all monitors are progressive displays and as such if fed an interlaced signal needs to deinterlace it before displaying it on
screen. If fed a signal that's not the display's native resolution it has to be scaled to match it. Both
increase the amount of input lag. Overall though there are few options to remedy a lagging display other than buying a new one.

*More FAQ's start here*

Section V: Final Words.
Well that about wraps up part one of this guide. Hope you come away knowing a little more about what to look for when buying your new display. Note though this guide can't do all the work for you. You still
need to do some research of your own before you buy and most importantly only you can make the
right choice, there is no one perfect display for any one task. Only you will know what is right for your needs but it doesn't hurt to ask around if you need some help. So here's to less lag and happy gaming.
 
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Rollergold

Rollergold

Rosa Boi
Supporter
Joined
Jun 3, 2018
Messages
19
Location
Calgary
#2
Capture Devices.

The Beginners Buying Guide


Ahh, capture cards, just like displays there is a vast array of options to choose from 15 dollar "easy
caps" to 900 dollar broadcast quality 3D capable monster cards and just like what I said with displays
there isn't one best capture device  (no not even the 900 dollar beast cards are the best).
When looking for a capture card you should ask yourself the following questions:

• What will I be recording with my capture card? (Wii, Xbox 360, PS3, PC?)
• How will I hook up my source to my capture card and how will I connect my capture card to my
display? (Composite, Component, HDMI?)
• What Resolution will I be recording at? (480p, 720p, 1080p?)
• How powerful is my computer?
• How much am I willing to spend?

If you ask yourself those questions and keep those answers in mind while looking around you should be able to find the card that best fits your needs.

Section I: On Box Specs.
Basically what to look for on the box or online.

Recording Fomats - Basically what resolution your recorded video will be at. Try to record at the same
resolution your display is at, to keep input lag at bay. Also try to record at the same frame rate as the
input source (either 30 or 60 fps) as some capture cards require the input frame rate and their set frame rate to be in sync.

Progressive vs Interlaced - Short Answer: Have an old bulky CRT use interlaced recording. Anything else use progressive recording.

Long answer:
Before today's age of high definition content most TV's no matter their size were
640x480 interlaced displays which draws line 1 then line 3 and etc down to the end of the
display then does line 2, 4 and etc effectively rendering the frame in 2 fields. Progressive scan draws the picture from top to bottom in order from line 1, 2, 3, and on in 1 field. All monitors and most TV's today are progressive scan displays and if fed an interlaced signal it needs to be
de-interlaced in order for it to be displayed which in turn increases input lag. Avoid recording an interlaced source if you run a progressive display.

Common recording resolutions:

SDTV 480i (NTSC, 720x480 split into two 240-line fields)

SDTV: 576i (PAL, 720x576 split into two 288-line fields)

EDTV: 480p (NTSC, 720x480)

EDTV: 576p (PAL, 720x576)

HDTV: 720p (1280x720)

HDTV: 1080i (1280x1080, 1440x1080, or 1920x1080 split into two 540-line fields)

HDTV: 1080p (1920x1080 progressive scan)

UHDTV: 2160p (3840 × 2160 progressive scan AKA 4K)

Inputs & Outputs- Basically the ways you will hook your source up to the capture card and if supported how you will hook your capture card up to your display. Most common connection types are composite: which is the yellow coded RCA jack, component: the red, blue and green coded RCA jacks and HDMI: The all-digital connector. Basic rules to keep in mind are if you record a 480i source use the composite input and output using the same. If you record a 480p up to 1080p source use either component or HDMI and keep the input and output connections the same so you avoid any extra input lag.

Lag Free Passthough/Output- Name basically says it all, if the capture card you're looking at has outputs look for a mention of a lag free pass through or outputs so you avoid any extra input lag.

Onboard H.264 Encoder- An onboard hardware processor on the capture device that processes the video from the source during recording/streaming, reducing CPU usage & improving system responsiveness during recording/streaming, great for older systems but requires use of the manufacture's provided software. Third Party recording/streaming programs like Xsplit and OBS generally can not use the H.264 hardware encoders on capture devices.

Computer Interface Types- Basically in a nutshell the way the capture card will send the video it records to your computer.

  • USB 2.0: The most common connector type. Most capture cards that use USB 2 do not require beefy computers, recorded vide file sizes are manageable and overall the device should be fairly priced and simple to setup and use.

  • USB 3.0: USB 2's replacement allows much faster transfer rates and much more bandwidth then USB 2 allowing for higher res capture @ higher frame rates and at higher bitrates and some offer lossless capture. Examples of USB 3.0 capture cards are the Blackmagic Intensity Shuttle, the Avermedia Extreme Cap U3 and Live Gamer Extreme. USB 3.0 capture devices require a much beefier computer and much larger storage system to take advantage of their higher quality.

  • Thunderbolt: Read USB 3.0 (Basically the same advantages and disadvantages as far as capture cards are concerned) Only Blackmagic makes Thunderbolt capture cards that I'm aware of at this time

  • PCIE: Short for PCI Express. This interface is for hooking up true capture cards that go in to a desktop computer. PCI-E cards don't need to be in their numbered slot to work (eg. a 1x PCI-E card will fit in a 1x to 16x slot, but a 16x card will only fit in a 16X PCI-E slot)


In order: USB 2 + USB 3, Thunderbolt, PCI-E.

Section II: Recommendations:
Because capture cards tend to cost less than displays I have the luxury trying many different capture
cards out and to keep this guide from being 20 pages long I'll just give the pros and cons and the bottom line for each product. If you need more info about a particular capture card ask about it in the thread

• Easy Cap/Dazzle Price: $30-$80 dollars | Buy from Amazon | Newegg



o Pros:
  • Price (30-80 dollars)
  • Requires very little PC horse power
  • Simple to setup and use

o Cons:
  • No outputs (requires audio and video cable splitters)
  • No component or HDMI inputs
  • Software might be too simple

o Bottom Line: The entry level capture card. Great for users still using composite inputs
and pc's lacking in horsepower but not much else, requires the purchase of AV splitters
for best performance. Unless you can't spend anymore there are better options available.


• Hauppauge HDPVR Price: $150-230 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports SD and HD inputs (Composite and Component)
  • Lag free outputs
  • Optical audio recording and pass through support
  • Reasonable System Requirements.
  • Requires no proprietary A/V cables.

o Cons:
  • No HDMI support
  • No Composite output
  • No 1080p support
  • Obsolete (Replaced by the HDPVR2)
  • Kinda Pricey (Most retailers sell it for $200 new)
  • Requires a AC adaptor to work

o Bottom Line: The former price-performance king. Still a strong contender if you can find it at a discount but you would be better off with the new HDPVR2 with its HDMI support, 1080p support and lower price

• Hauppauge HDPVR2 Price: $140-200 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports all major connections (composite, component, and HDMI)
  • Supports up 1080p60 input (records @ 1080p30)
  • Same Reasonable System Requirements as the original HDPVR
  • Same Lag Free output feature
  • Reduced Price over the HDPVR

o Cons:
  • No optical audio out support
  • Does not include the composite cable
  • Only outputs though HDMI
  • Uses a proprietary component to HDMI cable for Wii/PS3 capture
  • Needs an AC adaptor to work

o Bottom Line: The one of the price-performance king's. Has all the core strengths of the HDVPR but
now with 1080p60 and HDMI support. Creates good quality video without breaking the bank or requiring a pricey computer. Just don't lose the component to HDMI cable

• Elgato Game Capture HD Price: $160-180 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports all most connections (component, and HDMI)
  • Supports up 1080p60 input (records @ 1080p30)
  • Lag free HDMI output.
  • Compact Size
  • Reasonable System Requirements
  • Able to record at fairly high bitrates (up to 30mbps)
  • Includes all the cables you need regardless of which console you own.
  • No AC power needed, (powered over USB)
  • Great software package with handy features like direct in-software streaming to twitch and YT and flashback recording

o Cons:
  • No composite cable included
  • Only has HDMI output
  • Higher Price over the HDPVR2
  • Uses proprietary breakout cables for component and PS3 capture
  • Many of Elgato's features like flashback recording only work when using their software
  • No 1080p 60 FPS recording

o The Bottom Line: The product that put Elgato on the map for gaming capture devices, provides a flexible recording package for almost any kind of console in a USB 2.0 capture box with a great software package, no power brick needed that also fits in the palm of your hand. If you're looking for the best quality without requiring a beefy editing PC or Mac the Elgato is for you. Just don't lose the proprietary breakout component and PS3 capture cables. If you only stream/record from HDMI only devices like the Xbox 1, PS4, Wii-U, etc then consider the Elgato GC HD60 which supports 1080p 60 FPS recording instead. The OG (Original Gen) Game Capture HD is no longer made

• Elgato Game Capture HD60 Price: $180-230 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports 1080p recording @ 60 FPS
  • Supports recordings at a fairly high bitrate (up to 40mbps)
  • Secondary 3.5mm audio input
  • Lag free HDMI passthough
  • Compact Size
  • Reasonable System Requirements
  • No AC power needed, (powered over USB)
  • Great software package with handy features like direct in-software streaming to twitch and YT and flashback recording

o Cons:
  • Only Supports HDMI for video input and output
  • Many of Elgato's features like flashback recording only work when using their software

o Bottom Line: The "Current Sweet Spot" Capture Device from Elgato. Supports good quality video without breaking the bank or requiring a beefy computer to use it. Also supports 1080p 60 FPS recording, great for fast paced games but drops the analog recording inputs the OG Game Capture HD has.

• AVerMedia Live Gamer Portable 2/Live Gamer Portable 2 Plus Price: $180-210 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports 1080p recording @ 60 FPS
  • Supports recordings at a fairly high bitrate (up to 60mbps)
  • Lag free HDMI passthough
  • 3.5mm audio inputs for mixing in your mic's audio and party chat audio
  • Compact Size
  • 4K UHD passthough (on the LGP 2 Plus)
  • Reasonable System Requirements
  • No AC power needed, (powered over USB)
  • Able to record without a PC using a Micro SD card

o Cons:
  • Only Supports HDMI for video input and output
  • No Micro SD card included
  • PC Free recording bit-rate limited to 20mbps

o Bottom Line: The Live Gamer series from AVerMedia is Elgato's main competitor in the gaming capture device market. Offering a similar level of supported resolutions and frame rate's to Elgato's equivalent product but AVerMedia pushes PC free recording, higher supported bitrates and integrated mic & party chat inputs instead of features like flashback recording that Elgato supports on their capture devices. The LGP 2 is AVerMedia's Sweet Spot product, and like the Elgato GC HD60 provides a great balance of quality, price, feature set and PC horsepower requirements but adds PC free recording and built in mic + party chat inputs to set it part from the pack. If you play on a 4K display pickup the LGP 2 Plus as it features 4K UHD passthough on its HDMI output port.

• Elgato Game Capture HD 4K60 Pro Price: $400-500 | Buy from Amazon | Newegg


o Pros:
  • Supports 4K (2160p) recording @ 60 FPS!!
  • Supports recordings at a very high bitrate (up to 140mbps)
  • Lag free HDMI passthough
  • 4K UHD passthough

o Cons:
  • Requires a VERY Beefy Desktop PC with at available PCIe x4 slot & at least a 6th Gen Intel Core i7 (6700k) or AMD Ryzen 7 CPU & Nvidia GTX 10 Series or AMD Vega video card running WIndows 10
  • 4K video files sizes will eat your PC's hard drive space for breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • No HDR recording or Passthough support
  • Few Streaming services support 4K
  • Price
  • Not compatible with earlier versions of Windows or Mac OS

o Bottom Line: One of the first 4K60 capable capture cards on the market at a semi-affordable price. If you have a PS4 Pro or Xbox One X + a current gen gaming PC and want to record/stream your games at 4K the HD 4K60 Pro is one of the only cards available right now to support it. However due to its lack of HDR recording/passthrough support, and high price I would wait for other competitors to show off their 4K capture cards or wait for a version 2 of the HD 4K60 Pro.

Section III: Final Words.
Well that about wraps this guide. Hope you come away knowing a little more about what to look for when buying your new capture card.

Note though this guide can't do all the work for you. You still need to do some research of your own before you buy and most importantly only you can make the right choice, there is no one perfect capture card for any one task. Only you will know what is right for your needs but it doesn't hurt to ask around if you need some help.

So here's to great quality and sick montages.
 
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Rollergold

Rollergold

Rosa Boi
Supporter
Joined
Jun 3, 2018
Messages
19
Location
Calgary
#3
Updated guide with more modern capture cards (ie Elgato and AVerMedia) and removed the Blackmagic devices (Their feature set never lived up to their price tags for gamers and their drivers were flaky as all hell anyway). Also added a mention about adaptive refresh rate for the display section.
 
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